"American Artists in Rome," Lippincott's Monthly Magazine, Feb 1869

Dublin Core

Title

"American Artists in Rome," Lippincott's Monthly Magazine, Feb 1869

Subject

Relationships--Networks
Italy--Rome
Social Events--Studio Visits
Artists--US American
Arts--Literature
Artists--Sculptors--US American
Artists--Painters--US American
Arts--Literature
Arts--Studio
Arts--Architecture
Arts--Portraits
Gossip--Published
Praise
Athenaeum
Citation of Different Periodical / Reprint
Political Affairs

Description

The article starts with a graphic description of the Piazza di Spagna in a first-person plural narrative. It further includes passages on pieces of art in the studios that Brewster visited, buyers of portraits, reasons for purchases, the historical background of a painting by the artist Healy. Brewster also covers artists coming abck to the studios in Rome, she praises US-American artists working in Rome and characterizes the most gifted and interesting artists at that time.
Brewster concludes with the following comment:
"Miss Hosmer has returned. Miss Cushman is expected at Christmas, and with her will come Miss Stebbins.
There is quite an American colony of artists in Rome--men and women; and although 'on dit'--that disagreeable gossip--implies that there are thorns of discontent and discord in society, we have not yet discovered them, and hope we may not."
This article is understood as gossip elsewhere.

Credit

Hathi Trust

Creator

Brewster, Anne Hampton, 1818-1892

Source

Lippincott's Monthly Magazine

Publisher

J. B. Lippincott & Co.

Date

1869-02-00

Type

Reference

Article Item Type Metadata

Text

[...] On the right of our balcony extends a line of shops, whose fifferent names will recall longing memories of Rome to those who are far away from this enchanting city. [...] Several gentleman [sic] stand in front of the arched entrance, talking obver their newspapers, which they have just got out of the mail or more probably they are discussing the last event in Rome, the establishment of an American club. The club was started on Saturday evening, November 14, and became un fait accompli last night. The rooms are said to be very handsome, and are in Palazzo Gregoria, the edge of which building we can see from our balcony; it is opposite the Propaganda in Via due Marcelli. [...]
A givernment messenger in fine uniform dashes up the broad piazza on horseback; an Englishwoman with a superb, huge staghound passes; some dressy Americans, fresh from Paris (our rich countrywomen are unmistakable), stop in front of Nazzari's, and three sight-seeing, plainly-clad women, armed with Viennese satchels and guide-books, move briskly along, as if every moment was worth Third street price at noonday.
The studios are filling up rapidly: artists have returned from their summer trips and established themselves for the season. Besides the regular resident artists, some new ones are here for the winter. Among them are Church, McEntee, Gifford, Healy, etc. An afternoon spent in calling at the studios is an agreeable occupation. We gave yesterday to this sort of visiting, but could not accomplish more than two studios, a sculptor's and a painter's--Mr. Mozier's and Mr. Buchanan Read's. [...]
Mr. Buchanan Read's studio is at present one of the most attractive in Rome. He has a portrait of Cardinal Pertini, which is said to be the finest one that has been painted in Rome for many years. [...] But the principal object of interest just now at Mr. Read's studio is his unfinished portrait of Maria Sofia, ex-Queen of Naples. Mr. Read has been closely engaged for two weels at the Farnese Palace, where this beautiful young throneless queen has been sitting to our famous poet-painter, and his subject has inspired him to create a lyric in his picture. [...]
The fire in the flashing eyes of the queen is softened down almost into tenderness, and there beams from them a look of something like faith and trust in the future--a watching for the rising of the morning planet.
While looking at the picture we feel so impressed by its expectant expression that we cannot help recalling how many marvelous changes crowned heads have had in our memory, and imagination willingly restores this young Bavarian girl to the throne that slipped away from her just as she stepped upon it as a bride.
[...]
Miss Hosmer has returned. Miss Cushman is expected at Christmas, and with her will come Miss Stebbins.
There is quite an American colony of artists in Rome--men and women; and although "on dit"--that disagreeable gossip--implies that there are thorns of discontent and discord in society, we have not yet discovered them, and hope we may not.

Location

Philadelphia, PA, US

Geocode (Latitude)

39.9527237

Geocode (Longitude)

-75.1635262

Length (range)

>1500

Social Bookmarking

Geolocation

Citation

Brewster, Anne Hampton, 1818-1892, “"American Artists in Rome," Lippincott's Monthly Magazine, Feb 1869,” Archival Gossip Collection, accessed April 22, 2024, https://archivalgossip.com/collection/items/show/808.

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